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Soxxx conviction that the writing join of Cosmopolitan Haskins and Thom Williams was unequaled and animator Eleazar Kooda rentals some of the hilarious tweet pop tarts I have ever invented. If I may ask, why was that. He was the best of a system singer, he was a predetermined, burly guy with regards of interesting musical copies.


It pornn prove to be much pporn than just that in the end however. The irrational Stick Man became a real character, dominating the band with his psychic presence Bobbt to speak. As a unit we were up for Bboby and we intended to be the center of the tornado. Whenever all of us were together you just knew that we were going to Bobbt difficult. We had no respect Bogby anyone else. What was the band dynamic like? Did the band members get along with each other? The rumours are that you didn't always. That is Bobbg bit of a complex thing to answer honestly, but I'll try. I think that to a soxx extent we did all get along but we had to manage pron relationship.

Bobby Beeman and I were pretty close despite the difference in our ages. I think we often saw things in similar ways. Scott and I got along very well most of the time but I admit that there were periods where I was pornn at all porb Bobby soxx porn him. Sixx think I actually stopped speaking to him for about Bkbby Bobby soxx porn for some idiotic reason that I cannot remember. Worst of all, I didn't do enough to defend Scott when the Soxx pron ride soxs, mercilessly teasing him about anything or nothing. Bobby Soxx was a very nice and easy guy zoxx work xoxx most of the time despite his reputation otherwise.

Unfortunately, Scott seemed to be an easy target for the Soxx and he made him the butt of his jokes pporn than he should have. I don't mean to say that Bobby picked on Scott all the porb, he didn't, just more than I Bobby soxx porn have liked. No one Bobbu safe from Bobby's jokes but Scott was apparently seen as the weakest and he got more potn his share of abuse. As a result of years of taking this abuse from Bobby and frankly some from me as well, Scott has become estranged and really wants nothing to do with SMWRG or its memory. He was very influential within the band and was often its most eloquent spokesman.

It was a joke within the band that we didn't get along and so we never hung out together, only coming together to play shows. It really wasn't true, but it could look like that to some people. As I said before, Bobby Beeman and I got on quite well and spent a lot of social time together with mutual friends. Scott and I were both very interested in art and spent time going to museums and talking art and his great love, photography. We also always got everyone together, either before or after our shows, to eat Mexican food. What we didn't do was travel together. Scott always went with me and Vicky she was at every show and Bobby Beeman always got himself to shows.

What we did with the Soxx was another matter. At first he traveled with me and Scott but once after an unfortunate trip back from Austin or San Antonio one night when it was about 20 degrees outside, the Soxx was passed out in the back of my van and farted so bad and continuously, that for about five hours we had to drive with the windows open with the heater going full blast. After that episode, Vicky put her little high-heeled foot down and said no more Soxx in our van. We had to find other ways to get him to the show, even flying him to shows in Houston, Austin, and San Antonio rather than to ride in an enclosed vehicle with him.

We usually wrote by having the three of us improvise until something felt interesting while Bobby would rummage through his briefcase, pulling out fragments of lyrics in search of something he felt like singing. We just sort of pieced things together very loosely. The Soxx wrote essentially all of the lyrics, I think Bobby Beeman contributed some to the lyrics of Grave City which is one of my very favorite songs. We would flail around until something felt right and as the song started coming together we'd put together an arrangement. It would start sometimes with the Soxx chanting lyrics that he was working on, usually while he was cooking or some other kind of work.

He would often just chant snatches of lyrics no matter where he was. Often it might start with that and we would start feeling out some music to go along with it. We wrote the music as a unit. We all contributed equally to that. While in the studio in San Antonio recording a track for the compilation album Cottage Cheese from the Lips of Death, we wrote entirely new music to Christian Rat Attack, an old song of Bobby's that we had never played. We were originally planning on doing something else, I forget just what, but I think Beeman suggested that we write something on the spot. The Soxx suggested using the lyrics to Christian Rat Attack, a song that he had performed a few years earlier with the Teenage Queers.

We wrote completely new music, arranged, recorded, and mixed it all in about four hours with Butthole Surfer lead singer Gibby Haynes acting as engineer on the track. That's him laughing in the background at the end of the song. I'm not sure that I had ever even heard the original version. Later, the track was remixed without our permission by the owner of the studio, cutting off the spoken intro and burying the vocals in echo. As far as I know, this is the only reported incident of censorship on a hard core punk compilation album. Gibby later stole the original half track tape mix and gave it to us. That is the version that appears on Some People Deserve to Suffer.

It seems from the stories that are out there that Bobby didn't always treat people nice. The first time we ever played Austin we shared the bill with the Butthhole Surfers who were opening for us. While we were setting up a guy came up and asked if his band the Stains could use our equipment to play a few songs.

Of course, the Stick Man was not amused and we said fuck no. The Surfers offered them their equipment and they agreed to play three songs in between our sets. We reluctantly said ok as long as they didn't touch our equipment. When they managed to get things quieted down, the Butthole Surfers had to stand at the front of the stage with their arms linked together to keep the audience from storming the stage to get at us. We left town quickly after the show. They remembered but were cool about it. We all had a good laugh and a beer or two. As someone who knew Bobby well, do you think he was suffering from a type of disorder which led him to behave in the way he did?

We always knew that Bobby Soxx had major problems. He was, to be perfectly honest, crazy. Not drooling crazy, just nuts. He had been in the Terrell State Hospital, a mental institution in Terrell, Texas twice I believe, once for holding his grandfather hostage with a shotgun. Bobby had anger issues. In the beginning I had to personally vouch for Bobby's behavior to let us play at the Hot Klub where he had been banned for breaking a bottle over the head of one the Stranglers when the band was playing there. He had apparently been brought up in an unstable and ignorant redneck family and there were strong undercurrents of racist, possibly KKK history in the background.

Bobby was a very complicated and badly damaged individual. He was incredibly polite and gracious if he thought he should respect not fear someone. For example, although he was a horrible misogynist and treated women terribly, he always treated Vicky first my girlfriend, and later my wife like a queen. He also loved animals and cats and was rarely without a kitten if he had anything resembling a permanent home to keep it. Bobby's personal problems were Bobby soxx porn aggravated by his drug use, which was prodigious. When we worked together he abuse methamphetamines, cocaine, and a wide variety of downers and hallucinogens, sometimes daily.

These did not have much effect on him as a working member of Bobby soxx porn band however, he always seemed to be able to hold up his end of things. I could not tell that he had taken acid at all until the dosage was greater than four hits at a time. I Bobby soxx porn him anxiously telling me that he had taken seven hits of acid just as we went on stage to record our set for the Live at the Hot Klub album. So much for seven hits of acid affecting him, it just made him a bit nervous. I have said that he was often more professional in situations than I was, and it is true.

I was much more likely to be the one to give people a hard time than the Soxx was. I read an interview with Bob Beeman in which he mentioned Bobby soxx porn coming to Dallas and bringing some of Soxx's ashes. You kept them for a long time. If I may ask, why was that? I can't believe that you would ask me that. He was one of Bobby soxx porn closest friends. We worked together for the better part of eight years and we participated in some of the most artistically successful work that I have ever been involved in. The truth of the story though is that I had asked our friend Max Mabry to bring the ashes that were at the show. A few years ago I was coming to Dallas for a visit, Vicky's dad was undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer.

My trip just happened to coincide in a DJ's Reunion show that some friends were putting together in Dallas. I hadn't played in front of an audience since the last time we played, I think it was the oddly named Change Your Life Festival in Dallas in the late summer of I borrowed a Les Paul from Max, a Marshall amp from the guitarist from Quad Pi, called BOW drummer Russell Fleming, and we played, badly I must say, without a singer with different people from the audience singing or trying to sing. Max brought some of Bobby's ashes and we displayed them on stage so he could be there with us. I want to tell the story of the ashes though, I have never told any interviewer this before, so I guess this is a scoop for you.

Vicky was unable to come because of conflicts with her job so I went alone. During the wake I was introduced to a woman named Sunny who was ostensibly Bobby's wife. As the wake at Charlie Gilder's Bar of Soap began to wind down Sunny came to me asking me for a ride home. It was now dark, pitch black, and it had been raining very hard in Dallas the entire day. I had no idea where we were going as she led me on a circuitous route through East Dallas, an area I never knew very well to begin with. Eventually we stopped at a house and she said to come in, there was something that she wanted to give me.

We went inside, soaking wet to find a house that looked like your average mental picture of a crack den. There was no furniture, only a filthy mattress with three or four sad looking dogs lying in their own filth. She took me into another room, kitchen I think and proceeded to show me a partially drunk 44 oz. At that point, three or four very shady looking guys in their early 20s came in and went into another room. I was getting seriously uncomfortable. She told me to put my hand in and to take some of the contents and put them in the cellophane packet. I realized as I put my hand in that I had my hand in Bobby's ashes.

I stuffed the packet into my pocket and made for the door in a hurry. By the time I got to the car I was hysterical and it was raining very hard. I wiped my hand, filthy with my friend's ashes on the roof of the car in the rain and got into the rental car and drove away as quickly as I could manage. I drove about a block, pulled over and was hysterically crying for some time. When I could pull myself together enough, I pulled out my phone and called Vicky. She stayed on the phone with me until I could calm down a bit.

She then suggested that I drive over to Max's house and that he would take care of me since she couldn't be there. I did, and he did, just as she had said he would. While there I gave him some of Bobby's ashes since he was also a good friend of Bobby's and was actually creating a small shrine in his house with the ashes of a few other friends who had died over the past few years. Those were the ashes that appeared at the DJ's Reunion. My container of Bobby's ashes is here in my home, along with some ashes from another close friend, Paul Cornet, who died of a brain tumor in the nineties.

Were there any of your Texas punk contemporaries you rated highly? These days many of those bands, and the clubs you played in, have taken on a near mythic status. In the early days we played the Metamorphosis Concert Hall, a very small place where they let us do anything that we wanted no matter how weird it got. My fondest memories are of early SMWRG shows where we had done a variety of abstract things with the lighting and play especially unusual tapes through the PA as intro. I still can see fans standing up and screaming for us to shut it off! Honestly, I was never a big fan of many of the bands that were our contemporaries except for the Butthole Surfers and, of course, the Nervebreakers.

I never saw the Big Boys play but Bob Beeman was tight with them and I understand that they were very good. I think we were scheduled to play with them once but I don't remember why we didn't. Your average punk band was just that, at best average. Neither of those two that I just mentioned sounded like any other bands. Nervebreakers didn't fit anyone's mental picture of a punk band either. Frankly most bands on the scene weren't really all that interesting either. Don't get me wrong, I actually liked everyone as individuals, I just didn't like much of the music. I thought most of it was too derivative to be very interesting. Not many bands took much in the way of chances artistically.

SMWRG was just so much my world and vision that simply it pushed everything else to the side. Other bands were often more of an annoyance, something we had to sit through to get on stage. I was a very harsh critic, especially if I was suffering through some third-rate band's set and waiting to go on stage. Even worse, I was prone to taking out that irritation on the audience when I did finally get on stage, which I often did. I would sometimes deliberately sabotage my sound to make it incomprehensible just to piss people off if I was bothered about something. The Stick Man rears his ugly little baseball-capped head again. Other people, Bobby Beeman for example, would be a better, more charitable and certainly less biased source for you to ask this question.

The Surfers were very good friends, we started around the same time, we would trade off opening for each other, things like that. The biggest difference was that they had larger ambitions and we didn't. It was painfully obvious that to make it in the music business is very hard work and you would need to rely on each other to make it, and then to survive any success you might have. No one was stupid enough to rely on the Soxx for anything. No one was going to go around the country in a single van with the Soxx. Did you have a favorite place to play in Texas?

Soxx porn Bobby

Like I said, some of my fondest memories were of playing Metamorphosis. These were great places to play. The Ritz Theater in Austin, I think we played there twice. That was a very good place to play although during the last show we played there they were having serious power problems and we had to stop multiple times during the set. It was still a great place to play. I also liked The Island in Houston quite a lot. It was very large as I remember and had a large stage. The famous picture of Bobby showing just why you didn't really want to follow us was taken there. I think that was the only time he ever did that stunt. I don't remember who played after, but they were really pissed.

In general, most bands didn't like following us just because it was often anticlimactic for them. One thing that I will say is unlike today's kids, that virtually everyone that I met in the punk scene from the mid to late 70s through the middle and late 80s was a serious fan and were very knowledgeable regarding the history of rock music in general. Whether I liked their bands or not, all the young people were infinitely better educated about music than today's kids are. I assume that it is partly the fault of the radio and made worse by the download culture but almost everything that I ever hear is vapid and superficial.

Everyone wants to be superstars. I have been feeling for some time that rap killed rock and that rock is basically dead.

Respect you listening to the UK punishing bands in the heavily porm, whereby the Old and the Short, or the more christian bands like Wire and the Us. She dunked me very well and wrote that it wasn't ready but she actually didn't give that much about the tip either.

I'm just not sure everyone knows sox yet. I've told Pprn people this story than want to hear it, but when I was first starting to listen to the radio seriously, somewhere around or earlyAM radio was the only thing and the Dallas-Fort Worth area was a major center for top 40 radio. Texas businessman Gordon McLendon is generally credited with Bobb the top 40 poorn and he had major stations in Houston and Dallas. Dallas, New York, and LA were sxox three big radio cities where new material was being broken. Every weekend the major stations alternated new material with old songs.

As a result, I never actually recognized the difference so when the Beatles and the Stones started up in late they were played right alongside something recorded in Because of listening to music like this for years, I don't recognize era and genre differences as making any difference. This is the radio station in my head. Unfortunately young people in their ignorance have largely lost touch with their musical heritage. This heritage needs to be repeatedly plowed under and reborn by seeding its influence. Without people like B. Where would the rockabilly movement of the early 80s been without people like Carl Perkins and Gene Vincent?

If you go back and listen to the originals, they are still way better than the Stray Cats and any other Brian Setzer bands. If you are a jazz fan people don't think you are an old fogey for listening to John Coltrane or Miles Davis. Jazz fans have respect for the past.

Few rock fans today, soxd anything like that kind of respect for the past. Are you still painting? A lot of the musicians I've interviewed for this site paint now. In recent years, sludgy, downer hardcore, influenced by Flipper, No Trend, and Kilslug, Bobby soxx porn others, has emerged sxx one of the more unexpected trends. Bands like Sxox Jeans, whom I quite like, capture this influence and push it in new directions. Blbby as the initial bands of this style Bobvy clearly reacting with alacrity to the faster and shorter sounds and exhortations of early hardcore, the resurgence Bovby the early sooxx sound in the s led to a similar retort.

I do not find many of the original bands in this mode pirn particularly easy listen. They challenged the conventions of the convention-challengers; they were more antisocial than the antisocial. Notably, whereas some strains of punk and hardcore pkrn to be male-dominated, macho, and misogynist, some feminist women turned hardcore on its head and played uglier, more sarcastic, more angry, and more extreme music in response. Overall, the vibe here is slow, plodding, negative, downer, misanthropic music. It dovetails with one of the strains of hardcore that was prevalent in the US, in contrast to what prevailed in the UK: But the canniest bands, particularly the feminist ones, noticed that the system was inside the myself of legions of hardcore boys.

This mixtape is far from exhaustive, and I am tentatively feeling for the edges of this hard-to-identify sound and vibe. Most of the bands are from the US; examples of variations on the sound—though with quite different inspirations I think—from the UK and Australia are included as well. Yet no one else sounds quite like this. The live album of his band Teenage Queers is one of my absolute favorite records—punker than punk it is. This version is from his Can you feel the room getting smaller? Another favorite of mine, all the tracks, which vary in sound, ooze with anger and sarcasm.

They were inspired by punk, but this slab, recorded live, is a psychedelic experience for sure. In the late 90s, thanks to intrepid Bavarian punk detective Behjan Mirhadi, collectors were hipped to this bizarre record. I spent my lunch money on it. Unfortunately, skipping meals to buy records as a teenager stunted my growth. DIY-weirdness-to-punk-to-hardcore-to-antihardcore, aided by copious substance abuse. Supposedly, Church Police came up with their sound before ever seeing Flipper perform. Two posthumous 7"s have increased their popularity, from zero to fewer than a dozen fans, I reckon.

Along with Flipper, Subterranean put out a little-known single by a group of pissed-off lesbian separatists called Wilma. Each of the songs on the record sounds different.





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